07 May '15

LGBT Event : Why SciFi is perfect for LGBT themes (Plus FF recommendations) by Misa Buckley

Posted in LGBT 2015 / 3 Comments

 

Hola and a big smushy WELCOME to our LGBT event which is here for the month of May. We have reviews, Guest Posts, Top Ten List and lots and lots of prizes all with a LGBT theme. The posts will be indexed on the side and I do hope you hop through … I have been so lucky this year!

Today, we have a lovely post from Misa Buckley. I am a huge fan of both SciFi and LGBT fiction so this is the perfect post for the site as well. The recommendations are for good FF fiction in LGBT which I needed some recs for myself so thanks Misa 🙂 (Static has now come up twice … must read that book!)

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I grew up watching Star Trek. Weekday nights spent on a starship visiting new worlds and establishing relations (often in every sense of the word!) with new civilisations. The Enterprise was made up of a crew of men and women from all points of the Earth, plus an alien from the species that made first contact. There was a black woman on the bridge. Even as a child, I knew how significant that was.

The inclusion of every person, whether British, American, Chinese, Vulcan, was one of the things that brought me back to Star Trek over and over. Science fiction saw a future where race and gender weren’t issues, where every person mattered. It was a future I wanted to see.

We are, sadly, a way off Roddenberry’s vision. Yet science fiction as a genre remains, for the most part, hopeful. And more and more we’re seeing LGBTQ characters brought into that vision.

Yet to a point, they’ve been a part of the narrative for years. Asimov’s The Gods Themselves had an alien species with three sexes, challenging the accepted belief of the binary. Haldeman envisioned a future where homosexuality is unremarkable as eye colour in The Forever War.

However, the past few years have seen a wider acceptance. The end of sodomy as a crime, the dissolution of DADT policy, and the growing number of countries and American states allowing same sex marriage have given a taste of a lesbian and gay inclusive society. However, bisexuals are still considered “confused” or just “greedy”, while many discount trans and genderfluid individuals.

One quote I read when I started writing was that there “are no conventions in sci fi, except the ones you choose to break.” We love to labels things, to put them in neat little boxes, but life isn’t like that. Humanity is too complex to ever be tidy. As a science fiction author, I try to break the conventions that “order” my thoughts. I try to think outside the boxes. Sometimes I fail, because I’m human. “Better” is an ever-moving line that I’ll always be striving to reach.

That’s why science fiction is the perfect genre for positive LGBTQ stories – stories driven by characters that embrace the rainbow but aren’t defined solely by their sexuality, where they hold positions on starships or space stations, where they are out and proud but it is as unremarkable as their having blue eyes or dark skin.

Recommendations

Deep Deception by Cathy Pegau: lesbian romantic suspense

Colonial Mining Authority agent Natalia Hallowell doesn’t always play by the rules, but she wouldn’t compromise a case either. Put on administrative leave under a cloud of accusation, with no support from her boss, Natalia seeks a little anonymous companionship at her favourite bar. But she’s surprised when the woman who catches her fancy starts buying her drinks.

Prosperity by Alexis Hall: AU steampunk with gay, lesbian, and genderfluid characters

Prosperity, 1863: a lawless skytown where varlets, chancers, and ne’er-do-wells risk everything to chase a fortune in the clouds, and where a Gaslight guttersnipe named Piccadilly is about to cheat the wrong man. This mistake will endanger his life . . . and his heart.

Static by L.A. Witt: alternative Earth with genderfluid characters

Alex is a shifter, part of a small percentage of the population able to switch genders at will. Thanks to a forced implant, though, Alex is suddenly static—unable to shift—and male. Overnight, he’s out to a world that neither understands nor tolerates shifters . . . and to his heterosexual boyfriend.

 

About Misa

Misa is a sci fi romance author who finds writing a much-needed haven from the crazy of living with five kids, three of whom are teens, and a motorcycle-obsessed husband (in truth, she shares this obsession).

When Malik Foster crashes back into his life after a three year absence, Damaris wants nothing to do with his ex-lover. Especially once he learns that Malik has illegal cybernetic implants. Yet neither does he want to leave Malik to their less than tender mercies of a Purity Squad.

He agrees to use his surgical talents to remove the tell-tale tattoo that’s been branded on to Malik’s wrist, but being close sparks their past relationship, as well as challenging Dam’s belief that he’ll be safe in the new regime. When the Purity Squads come looking for Malik, and they know an escape is now or never. But can there be an escape from a regime that wants to erase anyone not falling into their definition of human?

Buylinks

Kindle:

AllRomance:

Nix

3 Responses to “LGBT Event : Why SciFi is perfect for LGBT themes (Plus FF recommendations) by Misa Buckley”

  1. Thanks for the post, I haven’t read many Sci-Fi books but I should probably check a few out. Static has been on my wishlist for a while and my library does have it on it’s shelves.

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